What Happens After You Leave the Job? | Wood Floor Business

What Happens After You Leave the Job?

Wayne Lee Headshot

It’s been a fun few trips out and about, still working on getting a handle on the demands of installing wood flooring across country. The odd thing is we all face a battle—about the one part we cannot control but are held responsible for. In my state we must stand behind the flooring for a full year from the day it was completed. If we could stop the battle we would, that battle is changing conditions.
 
Once we leave the job, who knows what goes on? Are they keeping the HVAC going? Are the other crews trashing the work? Who is looking out for the floor contractor’s interest? Well, to be honest, I still do not have it all worked out in my head yet. One thing that has come to full view is the timeline.
 
I would like input from all of you. At what point do you tell the builder the house is ready for wood? I have seen some with the drywall taped but no paint. I have seen some with the wet work crews walking over the hardwood to install, some with electricians cutting wires and letting them drop so others will just walk into them. I’ve been working on that—just a list of what needs to be done before the flooring comes into the home, let alone get installed. I would like your input so my list can grow, be adjusted or change the order of the job.

Well, they said that felt being missing would allow cold air and mice to get in the home.

Two weeks ago I was helping a friend do a lace in and install, boy, was that the strangest week. I don’t like to talk ugly about folks, but this job was bad—so bad we walked off the job and told the folks to keep all their money. They said they didn’t want the ¾-inch gap around the walls and that we must not know how to do floors or read a tape. The felt paper was cut back so we could glue and nail the last rows. Well, they said that felt being missing would allow cold air and mice to get in the home. We undercut the old subfloor and sheetgoods out from under the cabinets but the 1/8–1/4 gap was not right, and they said we need trim to hide our poor work. It went on and on, so we had to leave. I gave them the NWFA 800 number in response to “there are no guidelines to wood flooring and you are making it all up.” Sometimes the funds ain’t worth the pain. Sorry for the bad English, but we are just happy to be off that job.
 
While I am on the topic of looking at jobs: My blog about my trip to Colorado had a person comment and post a photo of a finish job a contractor had done. The question was, “Is this normal?” Well, the photos showed work less than what should be approved or normal, but what hurt the most was how folks got mean and used harsh words. I agree that the photos of the finish were not right, but let’s not get mean and cut a person up. Just say that it’s not right and move on. Words like “next time get real floor person” or “they don’t have a clue” just add fuel to a fire. We do not know if the HVAC came on, if someone opened a door or any number of things. Let’s never dig a grave and drop someone in it; let’s stick to just the facts, like Joe Friday would say.  

This week it’s off to see a friend in Cincinnati—John Alford with Above All Floors—and do a class with Panel Town and Flooring in Columbus, Ohio. I will take a few photos and pass them along as the week moves forward.
 
Until next time, remember to get the house ready for wood and the wood ready for the house.
 

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